Netflix and Spill: White Gold

Shady salesman of the 80’s may seem a bit dated and antiquated for our times, but add a well known Brit into the recipe and it’s quite a stir.

Double glazed window salesman may not sound like the flashiest or most impressive job to add to ol’ Ed Westwick’s repertoire, yet it’s a formula of smug smuttiness and self-assured smooth talking that sees us want to jump on the bandwagon.

Vincent Swan (Ed Westwick) stumbles into the world of door-to-door sales when he’s down on luck and stuck in the seemingly mundane life of a married man. He soon recruits fellow conmen and former Inbetweeners stars Joe Thomas and James Buckley while they schemingly avoid taxes, descend into debauchery and rock out to a killer soundtrack of John Paul Young, Wham and The Clash.

Perhaps the most fitting and consistent joke in the series is the name of the showroom itself, Cachet Windows (think of a Trojan horse in the days before the Internet). Therein lies the charm. The series is modern enough to resonate with a contemporary audience, since the themes of beefing yourself up to be more than you are and living a life of luxury that you cannot physically or pyschologically afford hold true. Unmistakeably the plot holes of not being discovered or having customers at least make further enquiries about the legitimacy of the product of the reputation of the salesmen are forgiven since there are no community ratings or Yelp reviews in this era. Our smoking guns come in the form of well-connected crims and tax agents determined to hunt down every cent.

Swagger abounds, suits are garnished and the confidence of a white collar criminal before the jury persuades us that these men are actually very likeable and even sympathetic characters.

For only 6 easy episodes of binging, it’s a diamond in the rough with enough glitter to satisfy.

 

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